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Davis, Weber Counties facing water shortage

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Posted at 7:43 PM, May 31, 2013
and last updated 2013-06-01 00:59:16-04

DAVIS COUNTY, Utah - Davis and Weber Counties are warning residents to limit their water use or they may run out before the summer ends.

The Garcias, who live in Sunset, started cutting back on their water use early on this year.

"Some people buy boats some people have big houses fancy houses, big cars. My husband and I like our flowers," said Leslie Garcia.

People caught watering their lawn in the middle of the day or using too much water get cut off, and Leslie Garcia says she sees too many people wasting water.

"I just wish people would take heed when they are told not to water. When it was raining so much, I saw people running their sprinklers. They have automatic sprinklers," she said.

Experts say that after a rainstorm, homeowners can use a screwdriver to determine whether it's time to water the lawn. If the screwdriver pushes into the ground easily, there isn't any need to water yet.

Randy Julander, a snow surveyor with the Natural Resources Conservation Services, says some of the reservoirs are considered completely empty and the runoff is starting to trickle off. That's lower than we should be at this point in the year.

"Right now the reservoirs across the state should be full or very close to full. Out of 46 reservoirs, we have four that are full," Julander said.

The Davis and Weber Counties Canal Company says so far this spring, they've saved more than 1,000 acres of water because of voluntary conservation efforts, but it's only a small amount.

"Basically it's a situation where we will be out of water if people use this year like they did last year. We will run out. Based on the snowpack, the run off and the storage carry over," said Ivan Ray with the canal company.

The secondary water company started enforcing water restrictions in Clinton, West Point, and parts of Layton, Kaysville and South Weber. People get two warnings that they're misusing water before their supply is shut off.

"They are either watering at the wrong time of the day or some have been spreading water to other areas of property that are not designated according to our records to water. We have to be fair to everybody," Ray said.

In the last month and a half, 150 homes have had their water cut.