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Board of Regents votes to increase tuition, fees at Utah’s public universities

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Posted at 2:41 PM, Mar 28, 2015
and last updated 2015-03-28 16:41:47-04

ST. GEORGE, Utah - Higher education at Utah’s public universities just got a little more expensive, as the state Board of Regents approved a 3 percent increase during their March meeting at Dixie State University Friday.

Tuition increases are something the Regents take up every year following the legislative session. Unfortunately for students, the trend is always an increase. The Regents followed the recommendation of State Higher Education Commissioner David Buhler and approved a first tier increase of 3 percent, and a second tier increase at the University of Utah for .5 percent. Buhler says his recommendation is always made with the students in mind.

proposed tuition increases“We’re glad that since it needs to go up, it’s going up a very small amount,” Buhler said. “And that’s because of concern for students and knowing that affordability is an important issue for students.”

The increase is primarily based of the amount of funding received from the state legislature for higher education. Buhler said overall higher education fared well during state budget negotiations, getting capital for several buildings. The tuition increase will mainly cover salaries and student support.

“Part of the funding that we receive from the Legislature, we’re required to match with tuition,” Buhler explained. “So I’m very pleased that the recommendation this year is the lowest increase in 16 years.”

In 2014, the regents approved a 4 percent increase. In terms of dollars, tuition for a 20-credit academic year is increasing on average between $100 and $150. At Dixie State University for example, Utah resident undergrads will end up paying $114 more per academic year. Students said tuition going up is never a good thing, but some said in this case it’s a little easier to swallow.

As long as it’s not a huge increase," DSU Sophomore Charley Peterson said. “Because it is really expensive, and we are poor college students. But it’s great for the college too when we’re expanding as a university.”

The Regents also approved changes to student fees at each of the state’s eight public institutions. Most of them were between zero and 3 percent. Dixie State got one of the highest increases at 7.6%. That increase is due to a $30 increase in athletic fees and the addition of a $119.70 Human Performance Center fee.

For a full report on tuition increases, click here.

For a full report on student fee increases, click here.