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City officials, developers work to preserve petroglyphs discovered in Eagle Mountain

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Posted at 9:37 PM, Feb 08, 2016
and last updated 2016-02-08 23:37:18-05

EAGLE MOUNTAIN, Utah -- Ancient petroglyphs are in the path of a new housing development in Eagle Mountain. Protecting them has led to a unique solution.

The Utah Rock Art Research Association was called in to look at the artifacts they believe the petroglyphs are up to 10,000 years old.

Now the builders of the new development along with the city have created a way to keep the ancient culture alive.

In the path of construction, ancient artifacts scatter a hillside in Eagle Mountain.

“We discovered some ancient artifacts 10 years ago on site and found that they are Indian hieroglyphics,” said Ryan Kent, Project Manager and Owner of JK Builders.

Believed to be left by Fremont Indians, experts say for thousands of years Eagle Mountain has been home for the ancient art. Now a suburban development is moving in.

“As the road continues to the west over the next year or two we'll be close to the petroglyphs,” Kent said.

To protect the petroglyphs builders are working with the city and the Utah Rock Art Association.

“They helped us determine which ones had the rock art on them and how old they are and how we can preserve them,” said Steve Mumford planning director for Eagle Mountain.

Now flags mark each rock covered with faded drawings. In a matter of days fencing will guard them.

“Eventually we'll have a permanent fencing around them interpretive signage and want to integrate it with the community and make it part of this community,” Kent said.

Here's a glance at the preservation plan with a pathway winding through the petroglyphs.

“It's a great opportunity to preserve some piece of history of the Cedar valley that was here long before any of the residents,” Mumford said.

The city hopes this will be an example of the best way to protect a priceless part of history.

“We want it to become part of the community we’re really proud of this,” Kent said.

Every petroglyph has been documented and photographed. City officials say the project will likely be done in a couple of years.