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Utah-based anti-porn movement kicks-off billboard campaign in Bay Area

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Posted at 10:06 PM, Oct 16, 2015
and last updated 2015-10-17 23:46:10-04

SALT LAKE CITY -- The Utah-based anti-porn movement called ‘Fight the New Drug’ has launched a billboard campaign. The organization has strategically placed 100 billboards in the Bay Area of California, which all have the same message plastered on a red background: "Porn Kills Love. Fight for Love."

Co-Founder Clay Olsen feels if they could make a splash in the Bay Area, they would be able to start a national discussion.

“The Bay Area is full of influencers and world changers and individuals that are on the forefront of the tech industry and other industries,” Olsen said.

In its five years in existence, Fight the New Drug’s virtual footprint has grown tremendously, with more than a million followers on Facebook, more than 21,000 on Twitter and 60,000 on Instagram.

“It’s doing exactly what we hoped it would do: It's stirring up a discussion. It's stirring up a dialogue,” Olsen said.

Even major celebrities, like former NFL star and Old Spice mascot Terry Crews, have been seen sporting the ‘Porn Kills Love’ T-shirt.

“To see that celebrities are starting to jump on board with this idea and with this campaign is not surprising. This is impacting many," Olsen said.

Fight the New Drug is nonprofit organization that launched this global campaign with one clear message. Olsen says they’re able to fund their efforts through private foundations, merchandising, and donations from their generous supporters.

“When we talk about it killing love it’s quite literally impacting the foundation upon which our society is built, and that's our relationships,” Olsen said.

Olsen says research has shown that people who consume porn on a regular basis find less satisfaction in their relationships and are more inclined to prefer violent forms of sexuality.

“Individuals that consume pornography on a regular basis end up preferring the fantasy to reality and end up preferring pixels to people,” Olsen said.

The movement is always looking for new ways to start this discussion, and Olsen says his fellow Utahns could find themselves driving by similar billboards in the near future.

“We may have a different slogan and a different kind of campaign, but no doubt we’re going to be making a splash here as well as other parts of the country,” he said.

The billboards will remain up in the Bay Area through November.

To learn more about the group, visit their Facebook and Twitter pages.