News

Actions

14-year-old boy identified after killed in car crash near Snowbasin

Default-Image_1280x720.png
Posted at 6:30 PM, Dec 30, 2015
and last updated 2015-12-31 14:26:47-05

WEBER COUNTY, Utah -- Authorities have identified the 14-year-old boy was killed after a two-vehicle crash in Weber County near Snowbasin ski resort as Leland Williams of Huntsville.

Three adults were taken to hospitals Wednesday night.

Police said they believe winter conditions contributed to the fatal collision.

Lt. Lane Findlay, Weber County Sheriff's Office, said the crash involved two vehicles and occurred on Trappers Loop Road at mile post 9 in the vicinity of Snowbasin ski resort. FOX 13 News first heard reports of the crash shortly after 6 p.m.

UDOT tweeted just before 6 p.m. that Trapper's Loop/SR-167 was closed in both directions in the vicinity, but later Wednesday night, about three hours after the crash, those closures were lifted.

Deputies at the scene said a white passenger vehicle was traveling southbound on Trappers Loop when the driver, a man from Huntsville, hit an icy patch of roadway and lost control. The car drifted into a northbound lane, struck a guard rail and then impacted a Jeep that was traveling northbound.

The driver of the white car's 14-year-old son died at the scene, and the boy's father, along with two adults traveling in the Jeep, were taken to hospitals.

The boy's father suffered injuries described as being not life-threatening.

Both occupants of the white passenger car were wearing seat belts, but a press release from Weber County Sheriff's Office states the teen is believed to have been killed instantly by the impact.

One occupant of the Jeep suffered a possible concussion, while the other occupant suffered an arm injury. Both were taken to hospitals with wounds not considered life-threatening.

Police initially stated the deceased was 16, but they later corrected that detail and stated the victim is a 14-year-old boy.

The incident marks the fourth fatal weather-related crash to occur in northern Utah this week.

"If you think the roads are icy, slow down," Findlay said. "It can be deceiving, especially at these higher elevations where it's really cold and can ice over really quickly, use caution, and, if in doubt, drive a little slower."

The identities of those involved in the crash have not yet been released.